About Nottingham Taverns

by Bill Carson 

The below extract is from Cornelius Brown’s- Notes About Notts, 1874:

pub

The five published volumes of “Records of the Borough of Nottingham” (AD 1155-1702) contain numerous references to taverns; throw a considerable amount of light upon the practices of both keepers and customers;  and indicate the feelings of the powers that were, from time to time, in respect to the management or otherwise of these public houses of accommodation.

1467-8

“Letitia Dodworth and Elizabeth Fox mad fine with our Lord the King reason of their bad conduct and disgraceful ordering and keeping of a tavern throughout the ninth hour of the night, against the ordinance of the town of Nottingham: half a mark. She has day in order that she go out of the town before the ninth day of April”.

1522

“We of the Const Quest present- item we present Thomas Stabollys for selling ale a boffe they Mayrys Prysse”.

1533

“We present Helene Attewell for because she will not sell ale according to Mester Mayre Commandement forth of her house by measure. This woman was known as Ellyn of the Hye Pavement”.

1537

“We present the ale houses in Carter Gate, namely Bartle Granby and Nycholas Walser because they are not able to lodge strangers nor mete to be alehouses”.

1593

“We request Maister Meare, that all the alehouses of the Back Syd (Parliament Street) of the town may be loukte tow”.

1613

“We present that there is no refformacion concerning the inffinitt number of all houses within this towne, considering that the been continually spoken of both at the Assises and Sessions, and yet nothing amended concerning the same”.

1619

“Wee present Richard Willson the alehouse keeper for receavinge of people into his house att one of the clocke in the night: fined and payed.”

1620

“Wee present Edward Tuten for a lewde frequentor of alehouses in time of divine service”.

“Wee present Robard Hope for keeping of company in his house in service time”.

1630

“Wee present Samuel Willdye for sufferinge sundrye persons to drinke in his house..till their shott came to 7 Shillings and in the end, fell out about the payinge of itt”.

1640

“Item we present Richard Smith for denyeinge to sell a pennyworth of ale out of doors”.

1648

“Agree, the alehouses-keepers that are not yet Burgesses shall not bee made Burgesses”.

1685

” Wher [e] as William Parnham was discharged from malting in this Corporacion, being a forrainer, according to an order  made in ye Quarter Sessions, he being not a Freeman of the said Corporacion, to be made a Freeman thereof, It is ordered therefore that he, the said William Parnham, shall be made Burgess, taking the Oaths as ye statute appoints”.

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About nottinghamhiddenhistoryteam

Originally formed in 1965 to try to save or at least record before destruction the cave sites continually discovered during the major redevelopment of the City that took place in Nottingham in the 1960′s. Almost every day new sites were unearthed and destroyed before anyone was notified; last thing they wanted was someone telling them to stop what they were doing; TIME is MONEY. The word HIDDEN in the Team’s title is because a lot of what was being invisibly lost in the redevelopment was our early history in the caves, they are under most, if now all, of Nottingham. In the 80’s and 90’s the Team conducted with the help of Dr Robert Morrell and Syd Henley, research and work on Nottingham’s history, folklore and local archaeology. The Team published quarterly magazines on their findings. The Team lapsed for a few years after the death of Paul Nix who was the team leader for thirty plus years. The Team has reformed and is now back working on Nottingham local history. On this blog you will find a series of history, folklore and archaeological related articles and information. Most of the material published will be specifically related to Nottingham/shire local history.
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One Response to About Nottingham Taverns

  1. As a kid my old man told me only “little people” drank in the flying horse, as the bar was below street level, when you looked through the window everyone apeared short.

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