1923, August, 20th: Mr Wiloughby is having a Land sale.

Wollaton, March 16th 1925

Lord Willoughby is selling some of his lands in Bramcote, Wollaton, Bilborough, Trowell and Cossall to be precice 4023 acres streching from Derby Road to the boundry of Strelley and Bilborough including the Broxtowe Hall Farm, The home of Sir Hugh Willoughby the Famous explorer, who lived there in the 16th centry.

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Plots 346-347 c1923- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

This was a view of the building plots 346 and 347 which are ajasent to the Nottingham and Derby road.

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Nottingham to Ilkeston Road- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

A view of the Nottingham to Ilkeston road before anything was built this plot being 303 and facing Wollaton Park.

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Nottingham to Ilkeston road- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

A view of the Nottingham to Ilkeston road before anything was built this plot being 261 faceing Wollaton Park gates you look into the trees there is a Lodge.

 

Article originally published by Peter Woodward of My Broxtowe Hundred Journal Website. 

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1854, April, 1st: The Kings Head Records.

Wollaton April 1st 1854:

At the inquest at the Kings Head public house held before Mr C Swann: On the body of Isaac Waters after a coal pit accident at Trowell, Isaac a small boy of 11years was employed in one of The Bramcote Moor pits. The son of John Waters of Trowell, on the afternoon of the 31st March Isaac was working when the roof of the pit fell in weighing about a ton and crushed the life out of him..

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The Kings head just off to the left- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

May 11th 1854:

This story is a shocking occurrence On Sunday night last in Trowell, a young woman by the name of Elizabeth Thorley, almost twenty years old, and a very attractive lass, had been living as a servant in Bramcote, under the pretext of being ill, about a month ago she left her place of residence and came home to her parents. Her father a labourer lived on Trowell moor, late one Sunday night she left the house to go to the privy having a pain in her stomock her mother missing her, went to look she found her but also heard cries of a infant coming from the ground, she hastened to get her husband, but when they returned Elizabeth had gone, the parents rescued the infant from the privy and the situation the it was in.

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Wollaton Pit from railway bridge- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

We understand that the infant after it remarkably well after it ordeal, search was made during the night for Elizabeth the mother but was unsuccessful, no trace could be found untill the next morning when about six of the clock some miners going to work a quarter mile from the parents home, were horrified to find the lifeless body of Elizabeth at the bottom of one of the many pit shafts, it was said “that she must have thrown herself in”. The inquest returned the verdict on Elizabeth,”That the deceased destroyed herself by throwing herself down a pit, while labouring under the strains of temporary insanity”.

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Wollaton Pit from the canal bridge- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

One of the old tennents of the public house were John and Hannah Burton, it was the Kings Head pub on the Trowell Road. Thomas Burton, was a maltster, he ran a maltsters and corn merchants business with a Joseph Pidcock. the family left Wollaton in about 1860, to move to move another local village of Strelley, and then to West End, Beeston, where he died.

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William Burtons letter- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

A remarkable story has been told to me today, It is about William Burton wheelright who was the brother of Thomas Burton, while working in Wollaton Hall many years before he had wrote a letter in September 1830, it was found in the roof of the Hall and it mentiones that the burton family were Blacksmiths for the Wollaton estate and came to Nottingham from London when the great House was being built.

 

Article originally published by Peter Woodward of My Broxtowe Hundred Journal Website. 

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1750, Wollaton: Early Maps of Wollaton

Wollaton, November 15th 1753

This map piece came from the map survey done by Thomas Chapman sometime in the 1750s, showing is the Nottingham canal plus the Bilborough Arm going to Bilborough coal wharf, that was in shepperds wood and Robinswood its even showing the nature reserve of “st martins pond” still there today.

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Map of Wollaton 1750s- Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

 

The road from Nottingham to Ilkeston is visable in the center of the picture running right to left over the canal bridge,(Wollaton Bridge) also is the Browns woodyard that seems to have been there forever.

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Sandersons 1835- Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

 

Looking carefully one can see three coachways leading away from Wollaton road , one opposite the hall gardens became Old Coach road going past Old park farm and on to Strelley village, again leading off this one is the coach road to Aspley Hall, the last is at the side of Wollaton bridge and leads to Strelley lane and into Strelley.

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Chapman 1774- Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

 

Map of 1774 again highlighting the site of the Kings Head public House on the main road between Nottingham and Ilkeston, on the site now, is another public house called the “Roebuck” renamed after the “the Deep Cellar” was altered.

 

Article originally published by Peter Woodward of My Broxtowe Hundred Journal Website. 

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Wollaton, August 1720: Children in Mr Willoughby`s Pits

Wollaton, August 1720

Joseph started work in one of Mr Willoughby`s pits, he is only 10 but we need to get some money to buy food, to put upon the plates of our children.

 

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Early mining boys- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

The industrial revolution started when these unsung hero`s as early as eight years old working for just enough to keep them alive, they were paid for what coal they dug, hours that could have been as much 16 hour per day, in conditions that were damp, cold and dangerious.

In the early bell pits where some times the pits collapses in on itself, later when some of the tunnels were only twelve to forty inches high, they had to crawl into, then start and dig the coal in the pits all over england and europe.

Child Labour & The Industrial Revolution

The teaching of children where they could, as too many of the children had to work to bring in a few morseles of food to help their perents, Who were trying to do their best but families were so big.

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A small Group of miners- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

 

During the 1800s with the Industrial Revolution spreading throughout Britain. The use of child labour became more and more prevalent steam and water powered machines, led to a massive increase in the number of factories (particularly in textile factories or mills) of the cotton and lace making Industries of the north of England.

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The Way out by Sledge- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

 

This type of work was not only dangerous where there was chance of losing a limb, you could die with the inhaling of dust which came off the machines. Or by gases if you were in the coal mining industry, this started very early with children as young as six in bell pits where there was chance you could be buried alive.

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Bell Pit- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

 

Children in mining, while working in bell pits which was just a hole in the ground about 2ft wide had gone down about 4meters it then open out into bottle or bell shape (example fig 1).

CHILDREN EMPLOYED IN COAL MINES,

The Text and Illustration was taken from Employment Commission 1842.

Q, What time did you get them up in the morning?
A, In general me or mistres got up at 2 o`clock to dress them.
Q, So that they had not above four hours` sleep by then?…
The common hours of labour were from 6 in the morning till half past-eight at night ?
A, Yes.
Q, Were the same intervals for food ?
A, Yes.
Q, Were the children ecessiveley fatigued by this labour.?
A, Many times; we have cried often when we have given them a little victualling
we had to give them; we had to shake them, as they have fallen asleep with the victualls in there mouths, many times.”

 

Article originally published by Peter Woodward of My Broxtowe Hundred Journal Website. 

 

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1588, November, 16th: A ride to see Master Willoughby’s New Masion

Wollaton , November 16th 1588

Rode over to Wollaton to see Mr Willoughby`s new mansion said “to have been built by exchanging stone for coal”. The Architect was Robert Smythson and Humphrey Repton designed the gardens.

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Wollaton Hall 1590- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

Wollaton Hall was started in 1580 and finished by 1588, the year of the Spanish Armarda, at a total cost of £8,000. Built with Ancaster stone, from Lincolnshire, with splendid gardens and orchards.

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Wollaton Hall 1970- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

The wealth of the Willoughby family was gained through the mining of coal, in Wollaton, Strelley and Bilborough and also some in Measham in Leicestershire.

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Wollaton Lodge Gates- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

In the persuance of building Wollaton Hall and and making its deer park, 790 acres, Fransis Willoughby leveled the small hamlet of Sutton Passey. The site of Sutton Passey is belived to have been on the junction of Wollaton Road and Radford Bridge Road.

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Admiral Rodney 1925- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

The village square of Wollaton with its public house and sheltered water pump is half a mile down hill from Wollaton Hall, just beyond the boundry of the deer park.

In the sale of the Willoughby land on 24th March 1923, this old Public house,(Admiral Rodney )was brought by Home Brewery Ltd for £5000.00 also it is still standing today and without many alterations.

 

Article originally published by Peter Woodward of My Broxtowe Hundred Journal Website. 

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Meet You by the Lions!

by Joe Earp

Two large stone lions guard the Council House steps. These lions have become a famous meeting point for many decades for thousands of Nottingham residents.The ‘Left Lion’ in particular has long since been adopted by locals as a meeting place.

Nottingham’s Market Place or Old Market Square as it is now known has been at the centre of Nottingham life for nearly one thousand years. Throughout history, it has been a meeting place for people of Nottingham as well as the location for local events. For hundreds of years the square played host to the market.

In the late 1920s Nottingham Corporation made the decision to move the market and the 18th century Exchange building was demolished. The square was redeveloped and the Exchange building replaced by the Nottingham Council House. The Council House with its 200 foot high dome and ten and a half ton bell called Little John, was designed by the architect T Cecil Howitt. The foundation stone (behind the left-hand lion as you approach the building) was laid by Alderman Herbert Bowles (Chairman of the Estates Committee), on 17 March 1927. The building was officially opened by the Prince of Wales (later Kind Edward VIII and the Duke of Windsor on 22 May 1929.

Th Council House as we have already learnt was designed by Howitt. The lions, and much of the sculptures surrounding the Council House, were by Nottingham sculptor Joseph Else (1874-1955). Joseph Else was the principle of the Nottingham School of Art on Waverley Street between 1923 and 1939.

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Nottingham’s Left Lion, circa 1950s- Photo Credit: The Paul Nix Collection.

Over the years the Lions have proudly been ‘guarding’ the Council House. They perhaps have become as iconic locally as Robin Hood or the Goose Fair. Just imagine the amount of people who have climbed over them as children and used them as a meeting point with friends and ‘dates’ in adulthood.

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Nottingham Lions, Old Market Square, circa 1960s. This photo sent to us by Elizabeth Vincent amiably illustrates the point of how the Lions have become a focal point over the decades. Photo credit- Elizabeth Vincent.

There is a lot of local folklore connected to the Lions. Perhaps the most famous is ’the tale of the lions roaring every time a virgin passes. There’ is of course the well known phrase, “‘meet you by the lions”. Which itself has become a local saying in its own right. For some unknown reason over the years the Left Lion has become the most famous of the two. A lot of people get confused as to which the Left Lions is. It is easy to locate, just simply face the Council House from the square and the Left Lion is the one on the left!

Over the years the Lions have become famous in local media and press. There is now a local website named after the sculpture and of course the now famous local magazine. In 2006 Nottingham City Council used the lion on some of its promotional material, in campaigns and on stationery.

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The Lions have become so acclaimed locally even Nottingham City Council have used them for various advertising campaigns over the years, as can be seen from this one. Photo Credit- Nottingham City Council.

There are alternative ‘names’ attached to the Lions, some people call them “Menelaus”and “Agamemnon”. Other names been given to them have been “Leo” and “Oscar”. Many of Nottingham’s residents over the years when planning a meeting point in the City have used the expression “meet you by the lions”. This saying in itself has subsequently become part of the local dialect of the City.

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Buttermilk Jack and the forgetful Witch

by Frank E Earp

Here is my retelling of a once very popular Nottinghamshire folk-story. I could find no original title for it, so I have given it my own, I think it suits the story line:

In a village close to Nottingham, it doesn’t matter which one, there live a poor widow and her son Jack. The widow kept one small cow which she would milk twice a day, in the morning and in the evening. After the evenings milking, she would take all of the days milk to her dairy where she would make fresh butter and cheese to sell at the great cheese market in Nottingham. To make a little extra money, every day Jack would set-off to Nottingham with the ‘buttermilk’ to sell in the streets and markets of the town. Now, as everyone knows, buttermilk is the milk which is left over after butter has been made. One thing that everyone doesn’t know is that witches are very fond of buttermilk.

With his cry of “Who’ll buy my buttermilk?” Jack was a familiar sight in the town. If you had a few pence, Jack would ladle out the delicious white liquid into your waiting vessel. That is why the good people of Nottingham called him Buttermilk Jack. But not everyone wanted to pay Jack for his milk. There was one old women, a witch, who did her shopping in the town. She often saw Jack and thought how nice it would be to get some of his buttermilk for free.

One day she saw Jack take a short-cut through a deserted alley. ‘Now’s my chance’ she thought. She stopped Jack and demanded that he gave her some of his buttermilk. Jack explained that he and his mother were poor and could not afford to give-away the milk. “Do you see this sack I have on my back?” she said. “If you don’t give me some milk I will put you in it and take you home and eat you for my super”. Jack still refused and so the witch caught hold of Jack and stuffed him in her sack, churn and buttermilk and all. Throwing the sack over her shoulder she set off for home thinking how wonderful her super would be; boiled Jack and a churn of buttermilk.

A little way out of the town gates the witch suddenly remembered that she had left a jar of oil in the alley where she had ceased Jack. The sack was too heavy to carry all the way back, so what was she to do? By the side of the road she saw a group of men cutting a thorny hedge. She put down her sack and asked the men if they would watch it whilst she went back to get the oil. The men agreed and the witch trottered off back to Nottingham. As soon as the witch had gone, Jack called out from the sack for help. How surprised they were to see their friend Buttermilk Jack when one of them cut the rope which tied the neck of the sack. Jack quickly explained what had happened and gave them all some buttermilk from his churn. He then filled the sack with some of the thorny bush the men had cut and they agreed to say nothing to the witch.

When the witch returned, she thanked the men and slung the sack over her shoulder and continued towards home. She had not gone a few yards when the thorns in the sack began to prick her back. The witch called out, “Jack, Jack! Thou doest prick my back”.

Expecting to find Jack, when she reached home, the witch emptied the sack out onto a white sheet she had spread out on the floor. How angry she was when the thorns came tumbling out. The witch vowed that she would have her revenge. The very next morning the witch came upon Jack in the same alley. Once again she threatened Jack that if he did not give her milk she would take him home and eat him. Again Jack refused and the witch stuffed him in her sack Now the witch had gone a little out of the town when she remember that she had left a fresh loaf of bread by the alley where she had captured Jack. But the sack was too heavy to carry all the way back, so what was she to do? By the side of the road she saw a group of men mending the road with stones. She put down her sack and asked the men if they would watch it whilst she went back to get the bread. The men agreed and the witch trottered off back to Nottingham.

As soon as the witch had gone Jack called out from the sack for help. How surprised they were to see their friend Buttermilk Jack when one of them cut the rope which tied the neck of the sack. Jack quickly explained what had happened and gave them all some buttermilk from his churn. He filled the sack with some of the stones the men had been using to mend the road and they agreed to say nothing to the witch. When the witch returned she thanked the men and slung the sack over her shoulder and continued towards home. She had not gone a few yards when the stones in the sack began to crack and bang together. The witch called out, “Jack, Jack! Thy bones do crack”.

Once again, expecting to find Jack, when she reached home, the witch emptied the sack out onto the white sheet she had spread out on the floor. How angry she was when the stones came tumbling out. The witch vowed that she would have her revenge. It seems that in all of these stories, none of the people learn form their mistakes, for the next morning the witch met Jack in the alley. You know what happens next so I need not tell you. This time however, although she had forgotten her potatoes, the witch was determined that she would not stop until she had reached home. When she arrived at her little cottage she put down the sack in the middle of the floor and gave it a little kick to make certain Jack was still inside. Jack gave out a yell and so, reassured, the witch set off back to get her potatoes, making certain she had locked the door after her.

As soon as he found himself alone in the cottage, Jack wriggled and twisted, twisted and wriggled until the rope that tied the neck of the sack became loose and he was free. Jack stood up and looked around him. Surprisingly for a witch the little house was neat and tidy. The curtains were clean, the table was scrubbed and on the dresser was fine Crown Derby china, (the witch had good taste). Quick as a flash Jack had an idea to teach the witch a lesson. He filled the sack with as much of the witch’s best china as he could and retied it. As the witch had forgotten to light a fire in the hearth Jack was able to climb out of the cottage up the chimney and return home, this time without giving any of his milk away.

When she returned home the witch found the sack where she had left it. This time she had him and her mouth watered at the thought of roast Jack and potatoes boiled in buttermilk. Without further thought she emptied the sack out onto the sheet spread over the flagstone floor. Out came the best Crown Derby and smashed to pieces in-front of her eyes.

The angry witch vowed that she would catch Jack and this time she would cook and eat him straight away. But Jack never again went down that alley and the witch soon forgot her vow and most of her shopping too.

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